Poets and Critics Symposium: John Yau, Thursday 25 and Friday 26 April 2024

John Yau, photo by Gloria Graham, taken during the video taping of Add-Verse, 2003
John Yau, photo by Gloria Graham, taken during the video taping of Add-Verse, 2003

The next Poets and Critics Symposium will be devoted to the work of John Yau.

Thursday 25 and Friday 26 April, 2024.

Université Paris Cité, Bâtiment Olympe de Gouges, 8 rue Albert Einstein, 75013 Paris

9:45 am-5 pm, room OdG 830 on Thursday 25 April (8th floor of the Olympe de Gouges Building)

and room OdG 115 on Friday 26 April (1st floor of the Olympe de Gouges Building).

image doigt petit

How  to get there?

For detailed instructions and directions, click HERE.

&

double change Poetry reading with Anne Portugal, John Yau and his translator Marc Chénetier

On the occasion of the publication of

Une autre façon d’écrire sur le sable, Selected Poems by John Yau,

edited and translated by Marc Chénetier (joca seria, 2024).  

Thursday 25 April, 7pm

atelier Michael Woolworth,  2 rue de la Roquette, Passage du Cheval Blanc, Cour Février,  75011 Paris M° Bastille. 

How to get there? For detailed instructions and directions, click HERE.

Thus far, we have focused on the writer’s own (creative and critical) work on the first day of the P&C symposiums and on broader issues of poetics and practice-based criticism on the second day. But there’s no specific preconceived program for the 2 days of the symposium: as the previous sessions of the program have shown, it seems important to let the conversation take its own course.

Please note that the morning session of the first day is devoted to preparing the conversation with John Yau which will take place during the afternoon session and the second day.

John Yau will be joining the group at 2pm on Thursday 25 April.

As usual, we intend to address all aspects of our guest’s work as poet, prose writer, critic, editor, and publisher.

Please feel free to make suggestions as to particular books that you would like to discuss during the symposium.

Our Thursday afternoon session with John Yau should end by 6 pm, which will leave ample time for everybody to get to the poetry reading.

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Poet, fiction writer, essayist, art critic, and publisher of Black Square Editions, John Yau has written across genres and worked in different mediums in order to expand poetry beyond the printed page. Starting in the mid-1980s, he began collaborating with American and European artists, from the widely celebrated to the young and emerging. The collaborations took the form of paintings, drawings, artist books, prints, postcards, objects, clothing, and jazz compositions.  Starting in the late 1970s, he began writing reviews and essays for art magazines, galleries, and museums in the late 1970s. ) Since 2002, he has taught contemporary art history in the art department of the Mason Gross School of the Arts (Rutgers University). He has written monographs on many artists, most recently, Liu Xiaodong (2021) and Joe Brainard: The Art of the Personal (2022). His most recent book of essays is Please Wait by the Coatroom: Reconsidering Race and Identity In American Art. In 2012, he began writing reviews regularly for the online magazine, Hyperallergic.  He has published more than 20 books of poetry.  

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The following bibliographical section is a work in progress: please contact us if you see a missing title & wish to add it to one of the bibliographies below.

Bibliography

Poetry

  • Crossing Canal Street, Bellevue Press, 1976
  • Sometimes, Tilbury House Pub, 1980
  • Broken Off by the Music, Burning Deck, 1981
  • Corpse and Mirror, Henry Holt & Company, 1983
  • Edificio Sayonara, Black Sparrow Press, 1992
  • Forbidden Entries, Black Sparrow Press, 1996
  • Berlin Diptychon, Timken Publisher, 1995
  • Borrowed Love Poems, Penguin Books, 2002
  • Ing Grish, Saturnalia Books, 2005
  • Paradiso Diaspora, Penguin Books, 2006
  • Exhibits, Letter Machine Editions, 2010
  • Egyptian Sonnets, Rain Taxi, 2012
  • Further Adventures in Monochrome, Copper Canyon Press, 2012
  • Bijoux in the Dark, Letter Machine Editions, 2018
  • Genghis Chan on Drums, Omnidawn, 2021
  • Tell It Slant, Omnidawn, 2023

Fiction

Criticism, Essays, Art Books

  • The sleepless night of Eugene Delacroix, Small Press, 1980
  • Miklos Pogany, Paintings and Works on Paper, Phillips Collections, 1985
  • Roger Brown, George Braziller, 1987
  • Radiant Silhouette: New and Selected Work 1974-1988, Black Sparrow, 1989
  • Four Painters: Michael Kessler, Archie Rand, Mark Schlesinger, Lynton Wells, Flint Inst of Arts, 1989
  • Yuri Kuper: Recent work, Claude Bernard Gallery, 1989
  • Big City Primer: Reading New York at the End of the Twentieth Century, Timken Publishers, 1991
  • A.R. Penck, Harry N. Abrams Press, 1993
  • In the Realm of Appearances: The Art of Andy Warhol, The Ecco Press, 1993
  • Ed Moses: A Retrospective of Paintings and Drawings 1951-1996, University of California Press, 1996
  • In Pursuit of the Invisible, Hard Press, 1996
  • The United States of Jasper Johns, Zoland Books, 1997
  • Max Gimblett , Craig Potton Publishing, 2000
  • Don Gummer–sculpture: Essay, Salander-O’Reilly Galleries, 2000
  • Dazzling Water Dazzling Light: Pat Steir Paintings, University of Washington Press, 2000
  • Randy Hayes: The World Reveiled, Oglethorpe University Museum, 2000
  • Tom Uttech : New Paintings, Alexandre Gallery, 2004
  • Mark Di Suvero, Knoedler & Company, 2005
  • James Siena : New Paintings and Gouaches, Pace Wildenstein, 2005
  • The Passionate Spectator: Essays on Art and Poetry, University of Michigan Press, 2006
  • A Thing Among Things: The Art of Jasper Johns, D.A.P, 2008
  • Will Ryman : A New Beginning, Marlborough Chelsea, 2009
  • William Tillyer : Watercolours, 21 Publishing Ltd, 2010
  • Nicholas Krushenick : A Survey, Gary Snyder Gallery, 2011
  • Sam Francis, Bernard Jacobson Ltd, 2014
  • The Wild Children of William Blake, Autonomedia, 2017
  • Thomas Nozkowski, Lund Humphries, 2017
  • Please Wait by the Coatroom: Reconsidering Race and Identity in American Art, Black Sparrow Press, 2023

Editorial Work

  • Fetish: An Anthology, Four Walls Eight Windows, 1998
  • New Smoke: An Anthology Of Poetry Inspired By Neo Rauch, Off the Park Press, 2009
  • « What’s It All Mean: William T. Wiley » in Retrospect, University of California Press, 2009
  • Viva La Difference: Poetry Inspired by the Painting of Peter Saul, Off the Park Press, 2010
  • The Triumph of Poverty: Poetry Inspired by the Work of Nicole Eisenman, Off the Park Press, 2012
  • Richard Artschwager: Into the Desert, Black Dog Publishing, 2014

 

Interviews

“A Symposium on John Yau, Commentary and Criticism”: Talisman Special Issue on John Yau (JSTOR open access – click on image)

Critical Bibliography

  • Birns, Nicholas. “John Yau.” In Asian American Writers, edited by Deborah L. Madsen, 348–58. Dictionary of Literary Biography: 312. Detroit, MI: Thomson Gale; Gale Cengage, 2005.
  • Campbell, Bruce. “‘Pieces of a Piece.’” Talisman: A Journal of Contemporary Poetry and Poetics 5 (1990): 126–34.
  • Caples, Garrett. “John Yau.” In American Short-Story Writers since World War II: Third Series, edited by Patrick Meanor and Richard E. Lee, 305–15. Dictionary of Literary Biography: 234. Detroit, MI: Thomson Gale; Gale Cengage, 2001.
  • Chaloner, David. “On John Yau.” Talisman: A Journal of Contemporary Poetry and Poetics 5 (1990): 113–14.
  • Cooperman, Matthew. “What the Poet Sees: An Interview with John Yau.” Jubilat 19 (2011): 26–49.
  • Corbett, William. “On John Yau.” Talisman: A Journal of Contemporary Poetry and Poetics 5 (1990): 114–15.
  • Donahue, Joseph. “Harmonic Interferences: A Note on John Yau.” Talisman: A Journal of Contemporary Poetry and Poetics 5 (1990): 118–19.
  • Fickle, Tara. “English Before Engrish: Asian American Poetry’s Unruly Tongue.” Comparative Literature Studies 51, no. 1 (2014): 78–105. doi:10.5325/complitstudies.51.1.0078.
  • Foster, Edward Halsey. “John Yau and the Seductions of Everything That Used to Be.” MultiCultural Review 3, no. 1 (March 1994): 36–39.
  • Foster, Edward. “An Interview with John Yau.” Talisman: A Journal of Contemporary Poetry and Poetics 5 (1990): 31–50.
  • Foster, Edward. “John Yau.” Talisman: A Journal of Contemporary Poetry and Poetics 5 (1990): 31.
  • Foster, Edward. “John Yau: A Selected Bibliography.” Talisman: A Journal of Contemporary Poetry and Poetics 5 (1990): 147–51.
  • Hemensley, Kris. “On John Yau.” Talisman: A Journal of Contemporary Poetry and Poetics 5 (1990): 116–18.
  • Huang, Yunte. “Pidginizing Chinese.” In Bilingual Games: Some Literary Investigations, edited by Doris Sommer, 205–20. New Directions in Latino American Cultures. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan (London), 2003.
  • Jeon, Joseph Jonghyun. Racial Things, Racial Forms: Objecthood in Avant-Garde Asian American Poetry. Contemporary North American Poetry Series. Iowa City, IA: University of Iowa Press, 2012.
  • Kim, Hyo. “The Pleasure of Indeterminacy: John Yau’s ‘Genghis Chan: Private Eye.’” College Literature: A Journal of Critical Literary Studies 48, no. 2 (2021): 233–58.
  • Lagapa, Jason. “Parading the Undead: Camp, Horror and Reincarnation in the Poetry of Frank O’Hara and John Yau.” Journal of Modern Literature 33, no. 2 (2010): 92–113. doi:10.2979/JML.2010.33.2.92.
  • Lee, Merton. “A Canon of Alterity: John Yau’s Corpse and Mirror.” In Positioning the New: Chinese American Literature and the Changing Image of the American Literary Canon, edited by Tanfer Emin Tunc and Elisabetta Marino, 143–55. Newcastle upon Tyne, England: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2010.
  • Leong, Michael. “Neo-Surrealism’s Forked Tongue: Reflections on the Dramatic Monologue, Politics, and Community in the Recent Poetry of Will Alexander and John Yau.” Contemporary Literature 55, no. 3 (2014): 501–33. doi:10.1353/cli.2014.0027.
  • Malroux, Claire. “La Poésie Au Fronton de La Ville: Jenny Holzer.” Po&sie 120 (2007): 248–55. doi:10.3917/poesi.120.0248.
  • Mar, Christine. “The Language of Ethnicity: John Yau’s Poetry and the Ethnic/Aesthetic Divide.” In Literary Gestures: The Aesthetic in Asian American Writing, edited by Rocío G. Davis and Sue-Im Lee, 70–85. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press, 2006.
  • Mobilio, Albert. “The Dream Science of John Yau’s ‘Dragon’s Blood.’” Talisman: A Journal of Contemporary Poetry and Poetics 5 (1990): 119–20.
  • Morris, Daniel. “Strangers and Oneself: John Yau’s Writings on Contemporary Art.” Talisman: A Journal of Contemporary Poetry and Poetics 21–22 (2001): 45–57.
  • Morris, Daniel. Remarkable Modernisms: Contemporary American Authors on Modern Art. Amherst, MA: University of Massachusetts Press, 2002.
  • Peterson, Eric. “A Bughouse Interaction.” Bughouse 2 (1994): 47–59.
  • Rohrer, Matthew. “John Yau.” In The VERSE Book of Interviews: 27 Poets on Language, Craft, and Culture, edited by Brian Henry and Andrew Zawacki, 177–98. Amherst, MA: Verse Press, 2005.
  • Schelb, Edward N. “Embalmed in the Camera’s Glowing Formaldehyde: On John Yau’s Hollywood Asians.” Interdisciplinary Literary Studies: A Journal of Criticism and Theory 18, no. 1 (2016): 81–95. doi:10.5325/intelitestud.18.1.0081.
  • Schelb, Edward. “Corpse and Mirror, Mirror and Corpse: John Yau and the Paintings of Jasper Johns.” Word & Image: A Journal of Verbal/Visual Enquiry 23, no. 2 (April 2007): 211–22. doi:10.1080/02666286.2007.10435781.
  • Wald, Priscilla. “‘Chaos Goes Uncourted’: John Yau’s Dis(-)Orienting Poetics.” In Cohension and Dissent in America, edited by Carol Colatrella and Joseph Alkana, 133–58. SUNY Series in American Literature. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1994.
  • Wald, Priscilla. “Guilt by Dissociation: John Yau’s Poetics of Possibility.” Talisman: A Journal of Contemporary Poetry and Poetics 5 (1990): 121–25.
  • Wang, Dorothy J. “Undercover Asian: John Yau and the Politics of Ethnic Self-Identification.” In Asian American Literature in the International Context: Readings on Fiction, Poetry, and Performance, edited by Rocío G. Davis and Sämi Ludwig, 135–55. Contributions to Asian American Literary Studies: 1. Hamburg, Germany: LIT Verlag, 2002.
  • Wang, Dorothy J. “Undercover Asian: John Yau and the Politics of Ethnic Self-Identification.” Thinking Its Presence: Form, Race, and Subjectivity in Contemporary Asian American Poetry, Stanford, Stanford University Press, 2013, p. 162-204.
  • Wang, Dorothy J. “Genghis Chan: Parodying Private Eye.” Thinking Its Presence: Form, Race, and Subjectivity in Contemporary Asian American Poetry, Stanford, Stanford University Press, 2013, p. 205-243.
  • Yao, Steven. “Oceanic Etymologies: Shanghai and the Transpacific Routes of Global Modernity.” Verge: Studies in Global Asias 3, no. 1 (2017): 77–106. doi:10.5749/vergstudglobasia.3.1.0077.
  • Yao, Steven. “‘The Owner of One Pock-Marked Tongue’: John Yau and the Logic of Ethnic Abstraction.” Foreign Accents: Chinese American Verse from Exclusion to Postethnicity. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010, p. 231-264.
  • Yu, Timothy. “Forgotten Capital: Touring Berlin with John Yau and Bill Barrette.” Xcp: Cross-Cultural Poetics 23 (2010): 105–15.
  • Yu, Timothy. “Form and Identity in Language Poetry and Asian American Poetry.” Contemporary Literature 41, no. 3 (2000): 422–61. doi:10.2307/1208892.
  • Yu, Timothy. “John Yau and Experimental Asian American Writing.” Race and the Avant-Garde, Experimental and Asian American Poetry Since 1965, Stanford, Stanford University Press, 2009, p. 138-159.
  • Zhou, Xiaojing. “Postmodernism and Subversive Parody: John Yau’s ‘Genghis Chan: Private Eye’ Series.” College Literature: A Journal of Critical Literary Studies 31, no. 1 (2004): 73–102.
  • Zhou, Xiaojing. “Two Hat Softeners ‘In the Trade Confession’: John Yau and Kimiko Hahn.” In Form and Transformation in Asian American Literature, edited by Xiaojing Zhou and Samina Najmi, 168–89. The Scott and Laurie Oki Series in Asian American Studies. Seattle, WA: University of Washington Press, 2005.

 

Inaugural meeting of the Network for New York School Studies (NNYSS) & Alice Notley Poets & Critics Symposium, April 20-22, Université Gustave Eiffel

Organizing committee: Rona Cran (University of Birmingham), Yasmine Shamma (University of Reading), Olivier Brossard, Carmen Husti & Nedjima Hassaoui (Laboratoire LISAA, Université Gustave Eiffel)

Practical details and program in the poster links & posts below.

 

Organizing committee: Vincent Broqua (Université Paris 8), Abigail Lang (Université Paris Cité), Olivier Brossard, Carmen Husti & Nedjima Hassaoui (Laboratoire LISAA, Université Gustave Eiffel)

Practical details and program in the poster links & posts below.

 

Poets and Critics Symposium 2022 : Alice Notley, Thursday 21 and Friday 22 April, Université Gustave Eiffel

© Alice Notley

The next Poets and Critics Symposium will be devoted to the work of Alice Notley.

Thursday 21 and Friday 22 April 2022.

9:45 am-5 pm, room 3V071, third floor, Bâtiment Copernic, Université Gustave Eiffel (Champs sur Marne), 5 Bd Descartes, 77454 Champs-sur-Marne

How  to get to Université Gustave Eiffel.

When you walk into the Copernic building, you can either take the elevators to the third floor (the elevators are located behind the staircase below) or take the stairs up to the third floor.

Room 3.071 will be on your right as you reach the third floor (if you take the stairs) or right in front of you (if you take the elevators)

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Poetry reading with Alice Notley and Pascale Petit

Thursday 21 April, 7pm,

Atelier Michael Woolworth

located off the Place de la Bastille, 2, rue de la Roquette, Cour Février, 75011 Paris, at 7:30 pm. How to get to Michael Woolworth’s atelier.

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Thus far, we have focused on the writer’s own (creative and critical) work on the first day of the P&C symposiums and on broader issues of poetics and practice-based criticism on the second day. But there’s no specific preconceived program for the 2 days of the symposium: as the previous sessions of the program have shown, it seems important to let the conversation take its own course.

Please note that the morning session of the first day is devoted to preparing the conversation with Alice Notley which will take place during the afternoon session and the second day.

Alice Notley will be joining the group at 2pm on Thursday 21 April.

As usual, we intend to address all aspects of our guest’s work as poet, prose writer, critic, and editor.

Please feel free to make suggestions as to particular books that you would like to discuss during the symposium.

Our Thursday afternoon session with Alice Notley will end at 5 pm, which will leave ample time for everybody to get to the poetry reading.

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If you would like to attend the symposium and are not already in touch with us, please contact us and we will send you information, instructions about and directions to the symposium:

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BIO

Alice Notley was born in Bisbee, Arizona in 1945 and grew up in Needles, California in the Mojave Desert.  She was educated in the Needles public schools, Barnard College, and The Writers Workshop, University of Iowa.  She has lived most extensively in Needles, in New York, and since 1992 in Paris, France.  She is the author of numerous books of poetry, and of essays and talks on poetry, and has edited and co-edited books by Ted Berrigan and Douglas Oliver.  She edited the magazine CHICAGO in the 70s and co-edited with Oliver the magazines SCARLET and Gare du Nord in the 90s.  She is the recipient of various prizes and awards, including the Los Angeles Times Book Award (for Mysteries of Small Houses, which was also a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize), the Griffin Prize (for Disobedience), the Academy of American Poets’ Lenore Marshall Prize (for Grave of Light, Selected Poems 1970-2005), and the Poetry Foundation’s Ruth Lilly Prize, a lifetime achievement award.  She is also a collagist and cover artist. Her most recent books are For the Ride and Eurynome’s Sandals. Forthcoming from Archway Editions is an artbook called Runes and Chords.

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Publications by Alice Notley

Books  of  Poetry

Runes and Chords, New York: Archway Editions, Forthcoming.

Songs for the Unborn Second Baby, London: Distance No Object, 2021 (reissued).

At The Foot At The Belt Of The Raincoat: Five Hundred places, 2020.

For the Ride, New York: Penguin, 2020.

Eurynome’s Sandals, Mont-Saint-Aignan, France, Presses universitaires de Rouen et du Havre, 2019.

Les Sandales d’Eurynome: Mont-Saint-Aignan, France: Presses universitaires de Rouen et du Havre, 2019.

Undo, Ottawa: above/ground press, 2018.

Certain Magical Acts, New York,:Penguin, 2016.

Benediction, Tucson: Letter Machine Editions, 2015.

Manhattan Luck, Oakland: Heart’s Desire, 2014.

Negativity’s Kiss, Mont-Saint-Aignan, France : Presses universitaires de Rouen et du Havre, 2014.

Le Baiser de la Négativité, Mont-Saint-Aignan, France, Presses universitaires de Rouen et du Havre, 2014.

Secret I D, Iowa City, Walla Walla: The Catenary Press, 2013.

Songs and Stories of the Ghouls, Middletown CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2011.

Culture of One, New York: Penguin, 2011.

Reason and Other Women, Tucson:  Chax Press, 2010.

In the Pines, New York: Penguin, 2007.

Grave of Light: New and Selected Poems 1970-2005, Middletown CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2006.

Alma, or The Dead Women, New York: Granary Books, 2006.

City of, Minneapolis: Rain Taxi, 2006.

From the Beginning, Woodacre CA: The Owl Press, 2004.

Waltzing Matilda, Cambridge, MA:  Faux Press, 2003. (reissued)

Disobedience, New York: Penguin, 2001.

Byzantine Parables, Cambridge (England): Poetical Histories No 45, 1998.

Mysteries of Small Houses, New York: Penguin , 1998.

etruscan reader vii (with Wendy Mulford and Brian Coffey), Newcastle under Lyme: Etruscan Books, 1997.

The Descent of Alette, New York: Penguin, April, 1996.

Close to me & Closer. . . (The Language of Heaven) and Désamère, Oakland: O Books, 1995.

To Say You, Riverdale: Pyramid Atlantic, 1994.

Selected Poems of Alice Notley, Hoboken: Talisman House, 1993.

The Scarlet Cabinet (with Douglas Oliver), New York: Scarlet Editions, 1992.

Homer’s Art, Canton, New York: The Institute of Further Studies, 1990.

From A Work In Progress, New York: DIA Chapbook Series, 1989.

At Night the States, Chicago: Yellow Press, 1988.

Parts of a Wedding, New York: Unimproved Editions Press, 1986.

Margaret & Dusty, St. Paul: Coffee House, 1985.

Sorrento, Los Angeles: Sherwood Press, 1984.

Waltzing Matilda,  New York: Kulchur Press, 1981.

How Spring Comes, West Branch, Iowa: Toothpaste Press, 1981.

When I Was Alive, New York: Vehicle Editions, 1980.

Songs For the Unborn Second Baby, Lenox, MA: United Artists, 1979.

A Diamond Necklace, New York: Frontward Books, 1977.

For Frank O’Hara’s Birthday,  Cambridge, England: Street Editions, 1976.

Alice Ordered Me To Be Made, Chicago: The Yellow Press, 1976.

Incidentals in the Day World, New York: Angel Hair, 1973.

Phoebe Light, Bolinas: Big Sky, 1973.

165 Meeting House Lane, New York: ‘C’ Press, 1972.

 

Autobiography

Tell Me Again, Santa Barbara: Instant Editions, 1981.

 

Lectures/ Criticism

 Coming After: Essays on Poets and Poetry, Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2005.

Dr. Williams’ Heiresses, Berkeley: Tuumba Books, 1980.

Bibliography of Critical Writings on Alice Notley’s work

Bibliography in progress – if you wish to add / submit a title or titles, please email or use form below.

 

Arterian, Diana. “‘Spirit Flows From Pieces’: Alice Notley’s Collage Art.” The Poetry Foundation website. Originally Published: August 30th, 2019.

Bendall, Molly, and Alice Notley. The Antioch Review, vol. 55, no. 2, 1997, pp. 247–248.

Bloch, Julia. “Alice Notley’s Descent: Modernist Genealogies and Gendered Literary Inheritance.” Journal of Modern Literature, vol. 35, no. 3, 2012, pp. 1–24.

Dubois, Page. “‘An Especially Peculiar Undertaking’: Alice Notley’s Epic.” Differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies, vol. 12, no. 2, 2001, pp. 86–97.

DuCharme, Mark. “Interview: Alice Notley.” Onthebus, vol. 4–5, no. 2–1 [10–11], 1992, pp. 284–95.

Foster, Edward. “An Interview with Alice Notley.” Talisman: A Journal of Contemporary Poetry and Poetics, vol. 1, 1988, pp. 14–35.

Foster, Edward. “An Interview with Alice Notley.” Talisman: A Journal of Contemporary Poetry and Poetics, vol. 23–26, 2001, pp. 526–35.

Hinton, Laura. “Down in the Dump: The Abject in Alice Notley’s Culture of One.” Journal of Foreign Languages and Cultures, vol. 3, no. 1, June 2019, pp. 127–37.

Hix, H. L. “Alice Notley’s Mythic Descent/Dissent.” Interlitteraria, vol. 13, no. 2, 2008, pp. 329–43.

Irwin, Mark. “Machine’s Corpse: Within the City’s Body.” Denver Quarterly, vol. 32, no. 1–2, 1997, pp. 125–33.

Johnson, Eleanor. “Critical Poetics: A Meditation on Alternative Critical Vernaculars.” Postmedieval: A Journal of Medieval Cultural Studies, vol. 6, no. 4, 2015, pp. 375–84.

Keelan, Claudia, and Alice Notley. “A Conversation: September 2002-December 2003.” The American Poetry Review, vol. 33, no. 3, May 2004, pp. 15–19.

Keelan, Claudia. “I Find Out Everything I Believe Through Writing: An Interview with Alice Notley.” Quo Anima: Spirituality and Innovation in Contemporary Women’s Poetry, edited by Jennifer Phelps and Elizabeth Robinson, University of Akron Press, 2019, pp. 58–75.

Lamm, Kimberly. “On Alice Notley’s In the Pines.” Talisman: A Journal of Contemporary Poetry and Poetics, vol. 36–37, 2008, pp. 23–27.

Lipkin, Elline. “Resist, Reframe, Insist: Alice Notley’s Poetics of Inclusion.” North American Women Poets in the 21st Century: Beyond Lyric and Language, edited by Lisa Sewell and Kazim Ali, Wesleyan University Press, 2020, pp. 108–28.

Macari, Anne Marie. “I Invented the Arts to Stay Alive: ‘Alice Notley’s’ Culture of One.” The American Poetry Review, vol. 42, no. 3, 2013, pp. 42–43.

Mccabe, Susan. “Alice Notley’s Epic Entry: ‘An Ecstasy of Finding Another Way of Being.’” The Antioch Review, vol. 56, no. 3, 1998, pp. 273–280.

McCabe, Susan. “Alice Notley’s Experimental Epic: ‘An Ecstacy of Finding Another Way of Being.’” We Who Love to Be Astonished: Experimental Women’s Writing and Performance Poetics, edited by Laura Hinton et al., University of Alabama Press, 2002, pp. 41–53.

Nelson, Maggie. “Dear Dark Continent: Alice Notley’s Disobediences.” Women, the New York School, and Other True Abstractions, University of Iowa Press, 2007.

Notley, Alice, and Robert Dewhurst. “Alice Notley.” Bomb, no. 133, 2015, pp. 96–102.

Notley, Alice. “Doublings.” The Grand Permission: New Writings on Poetics and Motherhood, edited by Patricia Dienstfrey et al., Wesleyan University Press, 2003, pp. 137–43.

David Reckford. “Interview of Alice Notley”Transatlantica [En ligne], 1 | 2019, mis en ligne le 01 juin 2020, consulté le 19 avril 2022URL : http://journals.openedition.org/transatlantica/13862 ; DOI : https://doi.org/10.4000/transatlantica.13862

Robbins, Amy. “Alice Notley’s Post-Confessional I: Toward a Poetics of Postmodern Witness.” Pacific Coast Philology, vol. 41, 2006, pp. 76–90.

Roman, Christopher. “The Owl of the System: Alice Notley’s Queer Poetics in The Descent of Alette.” Postmedieval: A Journal of Medieval Cultural Studies, vol. 6, no. 2, 2015, pp. 211–23.

Sadoff, Ira. “Inside/Out.” The American Poetry Review, vol. 29, no. 2, Mar. 2000, pp. 9–12.

Scalapino, Leslie. “Pattern-and the ‘Simulacral.’” Artifice and Indeterminacy: An Anthology of New Poetics, edited by Christopher Beach, University of Alabama Press, 1998, pp. 130–39.

Selinger, Eric Murphy. “That Awkward Glance.” Parnassus: Poetry in Review, vol. 21, no. 1–2, 1995, pp. 298–324.

Shamma, Yasmine. Spatial Poetics: Second Generation New York School Poetry. Oxford University Press, 2018.

Sikelianos, Eleni. “Eleni Sikelianos on Alice Notley.” Women Poets on Mentorship: Efforts and Affections, edited by Arielle Greenberg and Rachel Zucker, University of Iowa Press, 2008, pp. 217–27.

Skoulding, Zoë. “Alice Notley’s Disobedient Cities.” Feminist Review, no. 96, 2010, pp. 89–105.

Sturm, Nick. “‘I make these collages and write.’ Alice Notley’s Visual Art.” Jacket 2, December 22, 2020.

Sturm, Nick. “Unceasing Museums: Alice Notley’s ‘Modern Americans in Their Place at Chicago Art Institute.'” ASAP Journal, March 12, 2019. [Includes Alice Notley’s republished 1975 essay]

Zultanski, Steven. Thirty-odd Functions of Voice in the Poetry of Alice Notley. New York: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2020.

Zurawski, Magdalena. “Marxism for Single Mothers: Anne Boyer’s Garments against Women.” Polish Journal for American Studies: Yearbook of the Polish Association for American Studies, vol. 11, 2017, pp. 359–63.

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Save the dates > 2022 Calendar: Symposiums and Conference

Due to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, the inaugural meeting of the Network for New York School Studies (NNYSS), the Alice Notley Poets & Critics Symposium, as well as the “North American Poetry 2000-2020/1: Poetics, Aesthetics, Politics” Conference are postponed to 2022.

The NNYSS symposium is rescheduled to Wednesday 20 April 2022 (Université Gustave Eiffel)

The Alice Notley Poets & Critics Symposium to Thursday 21 and Friday 22 April 2022 (Université Gustave Eiffel)

The North American Poetry 2000-2020/2 Conference will be held from Wednesday 29 June to Saturday 1 July, 2022 in Paris (Institut Universitaire de France).

Details will be posted in due time on this website.

Poets and Critics Symposium 2020.1 : Lyn Hejinian, Thursday 13 and Friday 14 February

From writing.upenn.edu

The next Poets and Critics Symposium will be devoted to the work of Lyn Hejinian.

Thursday 13 and Friday 14 February, 2020.

Université Paris 7 Denis Diderot, Bâtiment Olympe de Gouges, 8 rue Albert Einstein, 75013 Paris

9:45 am-5 pm, room M19 (Mezzanine floor of the Olympe de Gouges Building, between ground floor and first floor).

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How  to get there?

For detailed instructions and directions, click HERE.

&

Poetry reading with Marie-Louise Chapelle and Lyn Hejinian

Thursday 13 February, 7pm, 

atelier Michael Woolworth, 

2 rue de la Roquette

Passage du Cheval Blanc, Cour Février, 

75011 Paris M° Bastille. 

How to get there? 

For detailed instructions and directions, click HERE.

Thus far, we have focused on the writer’s own (creative and critical) work on the first day of the P&C symposiums and on broader issues of poetics and practice-based criticism on the second day. But there’s no specific preconceived program for the 2 days of the symposium: as the previous sessions of the program have shown, it seems important to let the conversation take its own course.

Please note that the morning session of the first day is devoted to preparing the conversation with Lyn Hejinian which will take place during the afternoon session and the second day. 

Lyn Hejinian will be joining the group at 2pm on Thursday 13 February.

As usual, we intend to address all aspects of our guest’s work as poet, prose writer, critic, and editor.

Please feel free to make suggestions as to particular books that you would like to discuss during the symposium.

Our Thursday afternoon session with Lyn Hejinian should end by 6 pm, which will leave ample time for everybody to get to the poetry reading.

*

Lyn Hejinian teaches at the University of California, Berkeley, where her academic work is addressed principally to modernist, postmodern, and contemporary poetry and poetics, with a particular interest in avant-garde movements and the social practices they entail. She is the author of over twenty-five volumes of poetry and critical prose, the most recent of which are Positions of the Sun, which was published in January, 2019 by the Brooklyn-based independent feminist literary collective and small press Belladonna, and Tribunal, published by Omnidawn books in the spring of 2019. Translations of her work have been published in Denmark, France, Spain, Japan, Italy, Russia, Sweden, China, Serbia, and Finland. She is the co-director (with Travis Ortiz) of Atelos, a literary project commissioning and publishing cross-genre work by poets, and co-editor (with Jane Gregory and Claire Marie Stancek) of Nion Editions. Other collaborative projects include a composition titled Qúê Trân with music by John Zorn and text by Hejinian; two mixed media books (The Traveler and the Hill and the Hill and The Lake) created with the painter Emilie Clark; the award-winning experimental documentary film Letters Not About Love, directed by Jacki Ochs; the multi-authored 10-volume work The Grand Piano: An Experiment in Collective Autobiography (co-authored with Rae Armantrout, Steve Benson, Carla Harryman, Tom Mandel, Ted Pearson, Bob Perelman, Kit Robinson, Ron Silliman, and Barrett Watten [Detroit: Mode A, 2006-10])

*

Bibliography

Principal literary works

Poetry/prose

Tribunal (Omnidawn, 2019)

Oxota: A Short Russian Novel (Wesleyan University Press, 2019; revised from first edition [The Figures, 1991])

Positions of the Sun (NY: Belladonna Books, 2019)

The Unfollowing (Omnidawn Books, 2016)

My Life and My Life in the Nineties (Wesleyan University Press, 2013)

The Book of a Thousand Eyes (Omnidawn Books, 2012)

Saga / Circus (Omnidawn Publishing, 2008)

The Fatalist (Omnidawn Books, 2003)

Slowly(Tuumba Press, 2002)

A Border Comedy (Granary Books, 2001)

The Beginner (Spectacular Books, 2000; Tuumba Press, 2002)

Happily (Post-Apollo Press, 2000)

The Cold of Poetry (Sun & Moon Press, 1994)

The Cell (Sun & Moon Press, 1992)

My Life (second version; Sun & Moon Press, 1987)

My Life (Burning Deck, 1980)

Writing is an Aid to Memory (The Figures, 1978; reprinted by Sun & Moon, 1996)

Volumes of collaboratively composed poetry/prose and mixed-media work

The Wide Road (written with Carla Harryman; Belladonna, 2010)

Situations, Sings(written with Jack Collom; Adventures in Poetry, 2008)

The Lake (with Emilie Clark; Granary Books, 2004)

On Laughter: A Melodrama (with Jack Collom; Baksun Books, 2003)

Chartings (written with Ray Di Palma; Chax Press, 2000)

Sunflower (written with Jack Collom; The Figures, 2000)

Sight (written with Leslie Scalapino; Edge Books, 1999)

The Traveler and the Hill and the Hill (a collaboration with Emilie Clark; Granary Books, 1998)

Wicker (with Jack Collom) (Boulder, CO: Rodent Press, 1996)

Individuals (written with Kit Robinson; Chax Press, 1988)

Volumes of poetry translated and published in other languages

Mi Vide en Los Noventa (My Life in theNineties), tr into Spanish by Patricio Grinberg and Carla Chinski (Buenos Aires, Argentina: Zindo & Gafuri, 2019)

Fatalisten (The Fatalist), tr. into Danish by Alexander Carnera (Copenhagen: Det Poetiske Bureaus Forlag, 2018)

Pauza, rosa, chto-to na bumage (A Pause, a Rose, Something on Paper / My Life), tr. into Russianby Ruslan Miranov (Moscow: Hosorog No. 7, 2018)

Ma Vie (My Life), tr. into French by Maïtreyi and Nicolas Pesquès, (Dijon, Presses du réel, 2016)

Gesualdo, tr. into Turkish by Uygar Asan (Kadikoy, Turkey: Nod, 2015)

Minha Vida (My Life), tr. into Portuguese by Mauricio Salles Vasconcelos (Sao Paolo, Brazil: Dobra Editorial, 2014)

Felizmente (Happily), tr into Spanish by Gidi Loza (Playas de Rosarito, Baja, California: Editorial Piedra Cuervo, 2013)

Mi Vida (My Life),tr. into Spanish by Tatiana Lipkes (Mexico City, Mexico: Mangos de Hacha, 2012)

from My Life, tr. into Japanese by Junichi Koizumi, Toshiro (Shige) Inoue, Mamoru Mukaiyama, and Koichiro Yamauchi (Tokyo: Meltemia Press, 2012)

Mi Vida (My Life),tr. into Spanish by Pilar Vazquez and Esteban Pujals (Tenerife, Spain: Acto Ediciones, 2011)

Gesualdo, tr. into French by Martin Richet (Marseilles: Jacataqua, 2009)

Lentement (Slowly), tr. into French by Virginie Poitrasson (Paris, 2006)

Mitt Liv (My Life and My Life in the Nineties), tr. into Swedish by Niclas Nilsson (Stockholm: Modernista, 2004)

Mit Liv (My Life), tr. into Danish by Jeppe Brixvold with Line Brandt (Copenhagen: Borgen, 2001)

Jour de Chasse (The Hunt), tr. into French by Pierre Alferi; (Paris: Cahiers de Royaumont, 1992)

Edited poetry volumes

(with Olivia Friedman) Ghosting Atoms: Poems and Reflections Sixty Years After the Bomb (Berkeley: Consortium for the Arts and UC Regents, 2005)

Best American Poetry 2004 (New York: Scribner’s, 2005)

Critical writing

Volumes of critical writing

The Language of Inquiry (University of California Press, 2000)

Two Stein Talks (Weaselsleeves Press, 1995)

Leningrad, written with Michael Davidson, Ron Silliman, Barrett Watten (Mercury House, 1991)

Volume of critical prose translated and published in another language

Det öppna och det säregna (The Language of Inquiry), tr. into Swedish by Camilla Hammarström (Stockholm: Bokförlaget Lejd: 2016)

Edited volumes

(with Barrett Watten) Poetics Journal Digital Archive (ebook; Wesleyan University Press, 2015)

(with Barrett Watten) A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field, 1982-98 (University Presses of New England/Wesleyan University Press, 2013)

Translations

Volumes of translation

Description, poems by Arkadii Dragomoshchenko (Sun & Moon Press, 1990)

Xenia, poems by Arkadii Dragomoshchenko (Sun & Moon Press, 1994)

Other

Exhibition catalogues

In time; catalogue text for Diane Hall, “in time” (San Francisco: Rena Bransten Gallery, January 5-February 23, 2019)

Away at Home; curator’s introduction to exhibition catalogue of new works by German photographer Heike Liss (NY: CUE Art Foundation, spring 2006)

Work in other media

Visual art

Exhibition of Film Works (mixed media drawings), Kala Art Institute (Berkeley), spring 2017

Two mixed media drawings, in “Poetry and its Arts: Bay Area Interactions 1954-2004,” group exhibition at the California Historical Society (San Francisco), curated by The Poetry Center (SF State University), December 2004-April 2005

Two mixed media drawings, in “Poetry Plastique,” group exhibition, Marianne Boesky Gallery (New York), February 2001

“The Traveler and the Hill and the Hill,” two-person exhibition, Museo Nazionale dell’Architettura, Ferrara (Italy), May-June, 2000

“The Eye of Enduring,” painting and poetry (a collaboration with Diane Andrews Hall); exhibition at Sherrill Haines Gallery, San Francisco, 1995

Film

 “Letters Not About Love,” feature film directed by Jacki Ochs with script based on correspondence between Lyn Hejinian and Arkadii Dragomoshchenko (premier, South by Southwest Film Festival, First Prize: Documentary, 1998)

Music

Text for “Poetry and Playing,” CD by British avant-garde guitarist Derek Bailey (2003)

“Que Tran,” music and poetry (a collaboration with John Zorn); on cd (New Traditions in Far East Asian Bar Band Music), Electra/Nonesuch 1997

A Selected Lyn Hejinian Critical Bibliography, ed. Alice Wambergue

Lyn Hejinian: Selected Criticism

AJI, Hélène. “The Stakes of Narrative in the Poetries of David Antin, Ron Silliman, and Lyn Hejinian: New Forms, New Constraints,” Revue française d’études américaines, 103.1 (2005): 79-92.
–. “ ‘Life’ ‘Drafts’: Towards Two Non-Dogmatic Poetics,” Revue française d’études américaines, 147.2 (2016): 78-92.  

ALTIERI, Charles. “What Is Living and What Is Dead in American Postmodernism: Establishing the Contemporaneity of Some American Poetry,” Critical Inquiry, 22.4 (1996): 754-89.
–. “Lyn Hejinian and the Possibilities of Postmodernism,” Women Poets of the Americas: Toward a Pan-American Gathering, Cordelia Candelaria and Jacqueline Vaught Brogan (eds.), IN: University of Notre Dame Press, 1999.  

CARDUNER, Zach and Al FILREIS. “Surpassing things we’ve known before (PoemTalk#15),” the Kelly Writers House, PennSound, and the Poetry Foundation, March 2009, [podcast] available at https://jacket2.org/podcasts/surpassing-things-weve-known-poemtalk-15.  

CAZÉ, Antoine. “Alterna(rra)tives: Syntactic Spaces and Self-Construction in the Writing of Lyn Hejinian and Leslie Scalapino,” Ideas of Order in Contemporary American Poetry, Diana von Finck and Oliver Scheiding (eds.), Würzburg: Könighausen & Neumann, 2007, 197-214.
–. “ ‘The event is the adventure of that moment’: Hejinian Happenstance Happiness,” Lectures du Monde Anglophone, 2 Littérature et événement (2016).  

CRITCHLEY, Emily. “Dilemmatic boundaries: constructing a poetics of thinking,” Intercapillary Editions, November 2006, [e-book #1] available at http://www.lulu.com/shop/emily-critchley/dilemmatic-boundaries-constructing-a-poetics-of-thinking/ebook/product-577108.html#productDetails.  

DWORKIN, Craig Douglas. “Penelope Reworking the Twill: Patchwork, Writing, and Lyn Hejinian’s ‘My Life’,” Contemporary Literature, 36.1 (Spring 1995): 58-81.
–. “Parting With Description,” American Women Poets in the 21st Century: Where Lyric Meets Language, Claudia Rankine and Juliana Spahr (eds.), CT: Wesleyan UP, 2001, 243-265.  

EDMOND, Jacob. “ ‘A Meaning Alliance’: Arkady Dragomoshchenko and Lyn Hejinian’s Poetics of Translation,” The Slavic and East European Journal, 46.3 (Autumn 2002): 551-64.
–. “Locating Global Resistance: The Landscape Poetics of Arkady Dragomoshchenko, Lyn Hejinian, and Yang Lian,” Journal of the Australasian Universities Modern Language Association, 101 (May 2004), 71-98.
–. “The Closures of the Open Text: Lyn Hejinian’s ‘Paradise Found’,” Contemporary Literature, 50.2 (Summer 2009), 240-72. –. “Lyn Hejinian and Russian Estrangement,” A Common Strangeness: Contemporary Poetry, Cross-cultural Encounter, Comparative Literature, NY: Fordham UP, 2012, 72-94.  

GOLSTON, Michael. “A=L=L=E=G=O=R=I=E=S: Peter Inman, Myung Mi Kim, Lyn Hejinian,” Poetic Machinations: Allegory, Surrealism, and Postmodern Poetic Form, NY: Columbia UP, 2015, 101-44.  

HINTON, Laura. “Postmodern Romance and the Descriptive Fetish of Vision in Fanny Howe’s The Lives of a Spirit and Lyn Hejinian’s My Life,” We Who Love to Be Astonished, Laura Hinton and Cynthia Hogue (eds.), AL: University of Alabama Press, 2002, 140-51.  

HOFER, Jen and Rod SMITH (eds.). Aerial 10: Lyn Hejinian, DC: Aerial/Edge, 2015.  

KELLER, Jim. “Language as Visible Vapor: Skywriting through Lyn Hejinian’s Happily,” Poetry and Pedagogy: The Challenge of the Contemporary, Joan Retallak and Juliana Spahr (eds.), NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006, 224-232.  

LEMARDELEY, Marie-Christine. “Lyn Hejinian : l’écriture à la limite,” Études anglaises, 61.2 (2008): 192-201.  

MANNING, Nicholas. “Entre organisme et mécanisme : une façon désuète de penser la forme poétique contemporaine ?” Le Modèle végétal dans l’imaginaire contemporain, Inès Cazalas and Marik Froidefond (eds.), Strasbourg: Presses universitaires de Strasbourg, 2014, 59-71.  

NICHOLLS, Peter. “Phenomenal Poetics: Reading Lyn Hejinian,” The Mechanics of the Mirage: Postwar American Poetry, Michel Delville and Christine Pagnoulle (eds.), Liège: English Department, University of Liège, 2000, 241-52.  

PERLOFF, Marjorie. “Happy World: What Lyn Hejinian’s Poetry Tells Us About Chance, Fortune, and Pleasure,” Boston Review (February 2001),
[online] http://bostonreview.net/poetry-books-ideas/marjorie-perloff-happy-world.

SAMUELS, Lisa. “Eight Justifications for Canonizing Lyn Hejinian’s My Life,” Modern Language Studies, 27.2 (1997): 103-19.

SCAPPETTONE, Jennifer. “Microreviews: Summer 2003. A Border Comedy,” Boston Review (June 2003), [online] http://bostonreview.net/poetry/microreviews.

SHOPTAW, John. “Hejinian Meditations: Lives of The Cell,” Journal X, 1.1 (1996): 57-83.

SPAHR, Juliana. “Resignifying Autobiography: Lyn Hejinian’s My Life,” American Literature, 68 (1996): 139-59.

SWENSEN, Cole. “Re-membering Time in Hejinian’s My Life,” Revue française d’études américaines, 147.2 (2016): 93-99.

THOMAS, Chloé. “Déplacements du lyrisme dans le poème autobiographique postmoderne My Life de Lyn Hejinian,” Revue française d’études américaines, 145.4 (2015), 67-75.

TOMICHE, Anne. “ ‘We Do Not Encourage a Nightingale’ : Avatars du rossignol romantique dans la poésie du vingtième siècle,” Écrire l’animal aujourd’hui, Lucile Desblaches (ed.), Clermont-Ferrand: Presses Universitaires Blaise Pascal, 2006, 135-51.

VICKERY, Ann. “Supporting a Scene: Tuumba Press,” Leaving Lines of Gender: A Feminist Genealogy of Language Writing, NH: University Press of New England, 2000, 63-73.

WALDROP, Rosmarie. “ ‘Chinese Windmills Turn Horizontally’: On Lyn Hejinian,” Temblor,10 (1989): 219-22.

WOOD, Tim. “Between bibetgekess and ‘but…’ A Review of Lyn Hejinian’s The Book of a Thousand Eyes,” Jacket2 (April 2013), [online] https://jacket2.org/reviews/between-bibetgekess-and.

Poets and Critics Symposium 2019.1 : Dawn Lundy Martin, Thursday 17 and Friday 18 January

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Photo credit: Max Freeman – from http://www.dawnlundymartin.com

The next Poets and Critics Symposium will be devoted to the work of Dawn Lundy Martin.

Thursday 17 and Friday 18 January, 2019.

Université Paris 7 Denis Diderot, Bâtiment Olympe de Gouges
8 rue Albert Einstein, 75013 Paris

9:45am-5pm, room 830 (8th floor of the Olympe de Gouges Building).

Howimage doigt petit to get there?
For detailed instructions and directions, click HERE.
 &

Poetry reading with Dawn Lundy Martin, Marie de Quatrebarbes, and Maël Guesdon

Thursday 17 January, 7pm, atelier Michael Woolworth, 2 rue de la RoquettePassage du Cheval Blanc, Cour Février, 75011 Paris France – M° Bastille. How to get there? For detailed instructions and directions, click HERE.

If you would like to attend the symposium and are not already in touch with us, please contact us and we will send you information, instructions about and directions to the symposium:

Thus far, we have focused on the writer’s own (creative and critical) work on the first day of the P&C symposiums and on broader issues of poetics and practice-based criticism on the second day. But there’s no specific preconceived program for the 2 days of the symposium: as the previous sessions of the program have shown, it seems important to let the conversation take its own course.

Please note that the morning session of the first day is devoted to preparing the conversation with Dawn Lundy Martin which will take place during the afternoon session and the second day. Dawn Lundy Martin will be joining the group at 2pm on Thursday 17 January.

As usual, we intend to address all aspects of our guest’s work as poet, prose writer, critic, and editor. Please feel free to make suggestions as to particular books that you would like to discuss during the symposium.

Our Monday afternoon session with Dawn Lundy Martin should end by 6 pm, which will leave ample time for everybody to get to the poetry reading.

BIO, from www.dawnlundymartin.com

Dawn Lundy Martin is Professor of English in the Writing Program at the University of Pittsburgh. She is the author of several books and chapbooks including: A Gathering of Matter / A Matter of Gathering (University of Georgia Press, 2007), selected by Carl Phillips for the Cave Canem Prize; DISCIPLINE (Nightboat Books, 2011), which was selected by Fanny Howe for the Nightboat Books Poetry Prize and a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize; Candy, a limited edition letterpress chapbook (Albion Books, 2011); The Main Cause of the Exodus (O’clock Press 2014); and The Morning Hour, selected by C.D. Wright for the 2003 Poetry Society of America’s National Chapbook Fellowship. Life in a Box is a Pretty Life, was published by Nightboat Books in 2015 and won the Lambda Literary Award for Lesbian Poetry. Her latest collection, Good Stock / Strange Blood was published by Coffee House Press in 2017. Her creative nonfiction can be found in The New Yorker, Harper’s Magazinen+1, and boundary 2. She is currently at work on a memoir.

In 2016, Martin co-founded, with poet Terrance Hayes, the Center for African American Poetry and Poetics (CAAPP) at the University of Pittsburgh. She serves as the center’s Director. A creative think tank for African American and African diasporic poetry and poetics, CAAPP brings together a diversity of poets, writers, scholars, artists, and community members who are thinking through black poetics as a field that investigates the contemporary moment as it is impacted by historical artistic and social repressions and their respondent social justice movements.

With Vivien Labaton, Martin also co-edited The Fire This Time: Young Activists and the New Feminism (Anchor Books, 2004), which uses a gender lens to describe and theorize young activist work in the U.S. She is the co-founder of the Third Wave Foundation (New York), an organization, which was for 15 years the only young activist feminist foundation in the U.S. Martin continues her activist work in collaboration with foundations and activist organizations to research and strategize about protecting the lives and freedoms of women and girls. Using a intersectional lenses that bring together feminism with racial justice and LGBT rights, Martin works to provide analytical frameworks that assist philanthropic organizations in strategic philanthropy to level the playing field and animate social justice reforms.

Martin’s current creative-scholarly work operates in the intersecting fields of experimental poetics, video installation, and performance. Letters to the Future: BLACK WOMEN / Radical WRITING, co-edited with Erica Hunt, was published in 2018 by Kore Press. Her video installation work has been featured at the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit. In 2016 she was awarded an Investing in Professional Artists Grant from the Pittsburgh Foundation and the Heinz Endowments. Martin has also written a libretto for a video installation opera, titled “Good Stock on the Dimension Floor,” featured in the 2014 Whitney Biennial, and collaborated with architect Mitch McEwen on Detroit Opera House, a conceptual architecture project. She is the recipient of a 2018 NEA grant for Creative Writing. She is also a co-founder of the Black Took Collective, an experimental performance art/poetry group of three.

***

Critical work

by Dawn Lundy Martin

“A Black Poetics: Against Mastery.” Boundary 2: An International Journal of Literature and Culture 44.3 (2017): 159–163.

“Black Took Collective: On Intimacy & Origin.” Among Friends: Engendering the Social Site of Poetry. Eds. Anne Dewey and Libbie Rifkin, Libbie. Iowa City, IA: U of Iowa P, 2013. 211-237.

“Alien Eggs, or, the Poet as Mad Scientist.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua M. Wilkinson. Iowa City: U of Iowa P, 2010. 26-28.

Hayes, Terrance, et al. “African American Experimental Poetry Forum.” Jubilat 16 (2009): 115–154.

Martin, Dawn Lundy. “Saying ‘I Am’ Experimentalism and Subjectivity in Contemporary Poetry by Claudia Rankine, M. Nourbese Philip, and Myung Mi Kim.” Dissertation Abstracts International, Section A: The Humanities and Social SciencesU of Massachusetts, 20090101, p. 4679.

 

on Dawn Lundy Martin:

De’Ath, Amy. Decolonize or Destroy: New Feminist Poetry in the United States and Canada. Women: A Cultural Review 26.3 (2015): 285-305.